What is a Child Arrangement Order?

What is a Child Arrangement Order

One of the most challenging aspects of a separation or divorce is determining the arrangements for the children. In the UK, the legal route to formalise these arrangements is through a Child Arrangement Order. In this article, we will explore what a Child Arrangement Order is, how it works, and what it means for parents and children.

What is a Child Arrangement Order?

A Child Arrangement Order is a legal document that outlines the arrangements for a child’s living arrangements, contact with parents and other important decisions. It is usually made by a court and can be applied for by either parent, a guardian or any person with parental responsibility.

A Child Arrangement Order can cover a wide range of issues, including where the child will live, how much time they will spend with each parent and how decisions about the child’s upbringing will be made. It can also include specific details such as who will pick up and drop off the child for visits and how holidays will be divided.

If you are facing a dispute over arrangements for your children please get in touch, we can help.
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Shared Parenting

One of the main goals of a Child Arrangement Order is to promote shared parenting, where both parents have a meaningful and active role in their child’s life. This means that the court will usually try to ensure that the child has regular contact with both parents, unless there are concerns about the child’s safety or well-being.

Shared parenting is seen as beneficial for the child’s emotional and psychological well-being, as it allows them to maintain a relationship with both parents and have a sense of stability and security.

Court Considerations

The Welfare Principle

The welfare principle is an important consideration in a Child Arrangement Order. The court’s primary concern is the welfare and best interests of the child. When making decisions regarding child arrangements, the court will evaluate various factors to determine what is in the child’s best interests. This includes:

Parental Capability

Parental involvement: The court will assess the level of involvement and engagement of each parent in the child’s life. This includes factors such as the parent’s willingness to actively participate in the child’s upbringing, attend school events, and be involved in extracurricular activities.

Emotional and physical well-being: The court will evaluate the emotional and physical well-being of each parent. This includes assessing their ability to provide a safe and stable environment for the child, meet the child’s basic needs and promote their overall well-being.

Parenting skills: The court will consider the parenting skills and abilities of each parent. This may include their ability to communicate effectively with the child, provide appropriate guidance and discipline, and foster a nurturing and supportive relationship.

Mental and physical health: The court may also evaluate the mental and physical health of each parent. This assessment is important to ensure that the parent is capable of meeting the child’s needs on an ongoing basis.

Support network: The court may take into account the availability of a support network for each parent. This includes considering the presence of extended family members, friends, or professionals who can provide support and assistance to the parent in caring for the child.

A Child’s Wishes and Feelings

The weight given to a child’s wishes and feelings in a Child Arrangement Order can vary depending on the child’s age and maturity. The court will consider the child’s views and take them into account, especially if the child is old enough to express their preferences. However, the child’s wishes and feelings are not the sole determining factor in the court’s decision. The court will also prioritise the child’s best interests and consider other relevant factors such as the child’s safety, well-being, and the ability of each parent to meet their needs.

The Role of CAFCASS in Child Arrangement Order Proceedings

CAFCASS, which stands for Children and Court Advisory and Support Service, can play a crucial role in child arrangement orders in the UK. CAFCASS is an independent organisation that works closely with the courts to ensure the best interests of children are protected during family disputes.

When a child arrangement order is being considered, CAFCASS may be involved to provide expert advice and guidance to the court. Their primary responsibility is to assess the needs and wishes of the child and make recommendations to the court based on their findings. CAFCASS officers are trained professionals who conduct interviews with the child, parents and other relevant parties involved in the case.

CAFCASS officers gather important information about the child’s welfare, living arrangements, and any concerns or issues that may impact their well-being. They also aim to understand the child’s relationship with each parent and other family members. Based on this information, they prepare a report that is presented to the court.

The CAFCASS report carries significant weight in the court’s decision-making process. It helps the court understand the child’s perspective, their wishes and any concerns they may have. The report also provides recommendations on the best arrangement for the child, taking into account factors such as their safety, well-being, and emotional needs.

It’s important to note that CAFCASS’s role is not to make the final decision regarding child arrangement orders. The ultimate decision rests with the court, which considers all the evidence presented, including the CAFCASS report. However, the court places great importance on the recommendations made by CAFCASS, as they are considered experts in child welfare matters.

How Does a Child Arrangement Order Work?

A Child Arrangement Order can be applied for at any time, even before a couple has officially separated. It is usually recommended to try and come to an agreement with the other parent before going to court, as this can save time, money, and stress.

If you are struggling to come to an agreement between yourselves, family mediation is the next step and it’s essential that mediation is at least considered before the Court is involved.

The Mediation Information and Assessment Meeting (MIAM) is a crucial step in the process of applying for a Child Arrangement Order in the UK. Before applying to the court, parents are required to attend a MIAM, which is a meeting conducted by a professional mediator. The purpose of the MIAM is to provide parents with information about mediation and other alternative ways of resolving disputes, such as negotiation or collaborative law. The mediator will assess whether mediation is suitable for the parents and the child, and if it is, they will encourage the parents to attempt mediation before proceeding with court proceedings. Attending a MIAM is mandatory, unless certain exemptions apply. It is important for parents to understand the benefits of mediation and explore this option before pursuing a Child Arrangement Order in court.

In addition to being an essential part of the process, mediation tends to work better for the family in the longer term if an arrangement is negotiated between themselves, rather than an agreement imposed by a Court. Mediation enables the parents to maintain some degree of control over decisions whereas a Court will simply impose an order based on the facts as they see them and that decision will only consider what’s best for the child or children involved.

Custody Battles and Family Court Intervention

If an agreement cannot be reached, either parent can apply for a Child Arrangement Order through the court. The court will then consider the best interests of the child when making a decision. This means that they will take into account factors such as the child’s age, their relationship with each parent, and any special needs or circumstances.

Custody battles can be emotionally draining and expensive, and they can also have a negative impact on the child. It is always recommended to try and come to an agreement outside of court to avoid this situation.

What Does a Child Arrangement Order Mean for Parents and Children?

A Child Arrangement Order is a legally binding document, and both parents are expected to follow its terms. This means that if one parent does not comply with the order, the other parent can take legal action to enforce it.

For children, a Child Arrangement Order can provide a sense of stability and routine, as they know when they will see each parent and what to expect. It also allows them to maintain a relationship with both parents, which is crucial for their emotional well-being.

Impact on Parents

For parents, a Child Arrangement Order can provide clarity and structure, as they know what is expected of them and when they will have time with their child. It can also help to reduce conflict and tension between parents, as the terms of the order are legally binding.

However, a Child Arrangement Order can also be challenging for parents, especially if they do not agree with the terms or if they feel that the other parent is not following the order. It is important for parents to communicate and work together to ensure that the order is followed and that the child’s best interests are always the top priority.

How Can I Apply for a Child Arrangement Order?

If you are considering applying for a Child Arrangement Order, it is recommended to seek advice from a family law solicitor first. A solicitor can help you understand the process and guide you through the application.

To apply for a Child Arrangement Order, you will need to fill out a C100 form and submit it to the court. You will also need to pay a fee, unless you are eligible for a fee waiver. The court will then schedule a hearing, where both parents will have the opportunity to present their case.

Modifying the Child Arrangement Order?

When circumstances change and modifications to a Child Arrangement Order are required, it is possible to apply for a variation. This can be done by submitting a C100 form to the court, just like when initially applying for the order. However, it is important to note that the court will only consider variations if there has been a significant change in circumstances that justifies the modification.

When applying for a variation, it is recommended to soeak with a family law solicitor to understand the process and ensure that the necessary evidence is provided to support the request. The court will consider various factors when deciding whether to grant the variation, including the child’s best interests and the reasons for requesting the modification.

It is important to note that, in some cases, it may be possible to resolve the changes in the Child Arrangement Order through mediation or negotiation without involving the court. Mediation can be a helpful alternative to consider as it allows parents to discuss and come to an agreement on the modifications with the help of a mediator.

Enforcing a Child Arrangement Order?

When it comes to enforcing a Child Arrangement Order in the UK, it is important to understand the options available. If one parent is not complying with the terms of the order, the other parent can take steps to ensure enforcement.

Firstly, it is recommended to try to resolve the issue through communication and negotiation with the other parent. Sometimes, misunderstandings or disagreements can be resolved amicably without the need for legal action. However, if this approach does not work, the parent seeking enforcement can apply to the court for assistance. They can submit a C79 form, which is an application for enforcement of a Child Arrangement Order. The court will then review the case and decide on the appropriate course of action.

The court has various powers when it comes to enforcing a Child Arrangement Order. They can issue a warning or reprimand to the non-compliant parent, order them to attend parenting classes, or impose fines. In more serious cases where repeated breaches occur, the court can even consider more drastic measures such as changing the arrangements or even making an order for the child to live with the other parent.

It is important to note that before taking the matter to court, it is advisable to seek legal advice from a family law solicitor to understand the process and ensure that the necessary evidence is provided to support the case. The court will consider the best interests of the child and the reasons for seeking enforcement when making their decision.

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Common Questions About Child Arrangement Orders

What is a Child Arrangement Order?

A Child Arrangement Order is a legal order issued by the court in the UK that determines the arrangements for a child’s living arrangements, contact with parents, and other specific issues.

What can I do if the other parent is not complying with a Child Arrangement Order?

If the other parent is not complying with a Child Arrangement Order, you can try to resolve the issue through communication and negotiation. If that doesn’t work, you can apply to the court for enforcement by submitting a C79 form.

What powers does the court have to enforce a Child Arrangement Order?

The court has several powers to enforce a Child Arrangement Order. They can issue warnings or reprimands, order the non-compliant parent to attend parenting classes, impose fines, or even consider more drastic measures such as changing the arrangements or making an order for the child to live with the other parent.

When should I seek legal advice for enforcing a Child Arrangement Order?

It is advisable to seek legal advice from a family law solicitor before taking the matter to court. A legal professional can guide you through the process, help you understand your rights, and ensure that you have the necessary evidence to support your case.

What factors does the court consider when deciding on enforcement?

The court considers the best interests of the child and the reasons for seeking enforcement when making their decision. They will also review the evidence provided and take into account any previous breaches of the Child Arrangement Order.

Can the court help if there are repeated breaches of the Child Arrangement Order?

Yes, if there are repeated breaches of the Child Arrangement Order, the court can take more drastic measures such as changing the arrangements or even making an order for the child to live with the other parent. The court’s main priority is to ensure the child’s welfare and safety.

How long does it take to obtain a Child Arrangement Order?

The process of obtaining a Child Arrangement Order can take several months. It is important to note that the duration can be influenced by the complexity of the case, the court’s workload, and other circumstances.

Usually, the process begins by filing an application with the court. Once the application is submitted, the court will review the case and consider the best interests of the child. The court may also require additional information or evidence to support the application.

After the application is accepted, the court will schedule a hearing. The length of time between the application and the hearing can vary depending on the court’s availability. It is advisable to take advice from a family law solicitor to understand the specific timeline for your case.

During the hearing, both parties will have the opportunity to present their arguments and evidence. The court will carefully consider all the information provided and make a decision based on what is in the best interests of the child.

Who can apply for a child arrangement order?

Anyone who has parental responsibility for a child can apply for a Child Arrangement Order in the UK. This includes parents, guardians, and anyone who has been granted parental responsibility by the court. It’s important to note that if you are not a parent of the child, you will need to seek the court’s permission before applying for a Child Arrangement Order.

How Long Does a Chid Arrangement Order Last?

A Child Arrangement Order in the UK does not have an expiration date. It will typically last until the child reaches the age of 18, unless there are significant changes in circumstances that warrant a modification or termination of the order. However, it’s important to note that the court always considers the best interests of the child when making decisions regarding child arrangements.

What is a Specific Issue Order?

A Specific Issue Order is a type of court order in the UK that deals with a specific aspect of a child’s upbringing or welfare. It is usually made when parents or guardians cannot agree on a specific issue relating to the child, such as their education, religious upbringing, or medical treatment. The purpose of a Specific Issue Order is to provide clarity and resolve disputes regarding these specific issues. The court will make a decision based on what is in the best interests of the child.

What is a Prohibited Steps Order?

A Prohibited Steps Order is a type of court order in the UK that restricts or prohibits a certain action in relation to a child. It is typically issued when there are concerns about the child’s safety or well-being. A Prohibited Steps Order can be used to prevent a parent from taking certain actions, such as changing the child’s surname, removing the child from the country without permission, or making important decisions regarding the child’s upbringing without consulting the other parent. The purpose of a Prohibited Steps Order is to protect the child’s best interests and ensure their safety and welfare.

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2023-10-13T14:18:58+01:00
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